This wide-body Hyabusa-powered Seat is your new hillclimb hero

We’ve been saying this a lot lately…hillclimb events are an exercise in automotive awesomeness. You have mad geniuses applying their knowledge of go-fast parts to create vicious vehicles bent on pure speed. As mad as the builders are, the drivers are even worse. Take, for example, the pilot of this particular Seat 600.

The Seat 600 is the Spanish-market version of the Fiat 500. This one has been given a wide-body treatment that would make Japanese Lamborghini tuner Liberty Walk blush with jealous anger. More important, however, is the powerplant nestled beyond that bodywork. While the Seat employed a 633-cc engine in its previous life, it’s now making tremendous power from an engine borrowed from a Suzuki Hyabusa motorcyle.

That would be the 1,299-cc inline-4-cylinder engine plucked from one of the fastest street motorcycles of all time. It makes somewhere between 170 and 200 horsepower in stock form, and it revs quickly to its screaming 11,000 rpm redline. That’s more than enough power for a vehicle that weighs in the vicinity of 1,250 pounds, according to the YouTube description.

Watch how aggressively this Seat 600 attacks the corners. It comes wailing into view like a pack of pissed-off hornets hell bent on finding that finish line. This is a fantastic example of the wonders that result in the world of hillclimb racing. 

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