Volkswagen’s next ID electric car concept is an SUV

Volkswagen will reveal the third member of its I.D. series of concept cars during next week’s 2017 Shanghai auto show.

The I.D. concepts preview the automaker’s new family of electric cars, the first of which will be a Golf-sized hatchback arriving in 2020. Other members are expected to include a minivan, sedan, sports car and SUV.

Earlier this year we saw the I.D. Buzz concept which previews the minivan, and last year we saw the I.D. concept which previews the hatchback.

Volkswagen I.D. electric car concept, 2016 Paris auto show

Volkswagen I.D. electric car concept, 2016 Paris auto show

The concept set for Shanghai will preview the SUV. It will feature a coupe-like profile but will have four doors and a rear hatch. It will also have all-wheel drive and self-driving capability. The latter will be activated via a push on the center of the steering wheel.

All I.D. concepts, and the production models they’ll spawn, ride on the same MEB (Modular Electric Drive) platform which stores a flat battery in the floor and an electric motor at one or both axles. The range will vary for the production models but to provide an idea, VW says the I.D. Buzz can travel up to 270 miles on a single charge.

We’ll have more details soon as the Shanghai auto show opens its doors on April 19. For more coverage, head to our dedicated hub.

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