Vanda Dendrobium electric supercar spotted testing

Singapore’s Vanda Electrics surprised many with the unveiling of the Dendrobium concept during March’s 2017 Geneva auto show.

Perhaps what’s even more surprising, though, is that this small firm fully intends to put the electric supercar into production. It’s surprising because the company’s other products consist of a small commercial vehicle and scooter.

Handling most of the Dendrobium’s development is Williams Advanced Engineering, the technology offshoot of the Williams Formula 1 team.

The engineering firm will also help Vanda with production. We’re talking just a handful of cars, as pricing is expected to range into seven-figure territory.

Vanda Dendrobium concept, 2017 Geneva auto show

Vanda Dendrobium concept, 2017 Geneva auto show

Vanda Dendrobium concept, 2017 Geneva auto show

Vanda Dendrobium concept, 2017 Geneva auto show

Vanda Dendrobium concept, 2017 Geneva auto show

Vanda Dendrobium concept, 2017 Geneva auto show

The video above was filmed near Williams Advanced Engineering’s headquarters in the United Kingdom. It shows the Dendrobium driving very close to the ground and with near silent propulsion.

Vanda has been short on details, though the company did say the Dendrobium concept was fitted with two electric motors at each axle, with a single-speed gearbox and differential at the front and a multi-speed gearbox and differential at the rear. Powering the electric motors was a lithium-ion battery of unknown size.

While no power or range figures were mentioned at the concept’s reveal, Vanda said the vehicle’s targeted performance was 0-60 mph acceleration in 2.7 seconds and a top speed in excess of 200 mph.

The company also said it was looking at 2020 as the start date for production.

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