Tag Archives: Engineering Explained

Are expensive tires worth the price?

Everyone likes to find ways to save money. With respect to your car, there are times when you can opt for lower octane fuel, more affordable oil, and non-OEM parts. But should you skimp when it comes to buying tires? Recently, Engineering Explained looked at the performance variation as your tires get older. Once it's time to actually change them...

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What’s the performance difference between new and used tires?

Jason Fenske from Engineering Explained is here to tell you all about what happens as your tires wear down. While you think it's a simple reduction in grip, there's a whole lot more to process. In fact, certain tires can see an increase in grip as the tire wears down. Confused? You won't be for long. One of the most important features for a tire is how much...

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How does a V-8 engine work?

V-8 engines are one of the most common styles of engine across the entire automotive industry, especially when the goal is to produce a lot of power with a smooth delivery. So, how does such an engine work? Jason Fenske of Engineering Explained is here to shed light on how a V-8 engine operates. Specifically, he uses a General Motors' popular LS3 6.2-liter...

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The RCCI engine uses both gasoline and diesel fuel

When most of us pull up to the pump, we are in vehicles that require gasoline. A portion of us sidle up to diesel pumps. In the future, maybe we'll we'll drive vehicles with RCCI engines and we'll need to hit both pumps. The Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engine is a concept engine being developed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison...

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What are the differences between flooded and AGM lead-acid batteries?

While the engine of your car might be its heart, it's the battery that provides the juice to get that engine moving. By now, you probably know plenty about how your engine works. Do you know anything about your battery, though? If not, you're going to need to watch this video from Engineering Explained in conjunction with Optima Batteries. Our friendly host...

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5 reasons why diesel engines make more torque than gasoline engines

Horsepower is fun in its own way, but torque can be just as entertaining. If you want to rip stumps out of the ground, you'll want a whole lot of torque. That also means you'll likely prefer a diesel engine. Compared to their gasoline-swilling counterparts, diesel engines are the torque kings. Why is that? Jason Fenkse from Engineering Explained knows why...

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Here’s why expensive cars aren’t always reliable

When you think about expensive automobiles, there's one data point that doesn't often enter into the discussion. That would be reliability. It seems the more you spend on a car, the less reliable it becomes. But is that truly the case? Jason Fenske from Engineering Explained is here to examine this idea, see if it holds up, and discuss why it might not...

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Here’s how Mazda goes about reducing turbo lag

Mazda hasn't been shy about its dedication to the internal combustion engine. After all, the Japanese company will likely arrive first to market with a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine (HCCI), which will provide tremendous fuel economy improvements without the loss of performance. But today we're talking turbo lag, and how Mazda aims to reduce...

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Why don’t pushrod engines have high redlines?

Pushrod engines may not be high-tech by today's standards, but they soldier on and have benefits of their own. One downfall, however, is their ability to rev. Pushrod engines tend to have rather low redlines. You won't find a GM small-block V-8 revving to 9,000 rpm, but there's a reason for it all. Jason Fenske of Engineering Explained is here to help us...

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What is an octane rating and what does it mean?

You pull up to the pump and you are presented with a few choices, and we're not talking about different fuel types here. We're talking, of course, about octane ratings. Those are large figures at the fueling station, and you know if you press the higher one you're going to spend more money. Why is that and what does is all mean? Jason Fenske from...

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