Steady as he goes; Lyle Fisk is the patron saint of pinstriping

It may seem commonplace now, but pinstriping has come a long way from its luxury roots. The practice is now in vogue in hot rod customization culture, or as professional pinstriper, Edward Lyle Fisk calls it, “embellishing.”

Fisk is one of only a handful of people who have dedicated their lives to the art of pinstriping. No, those extravagant, crisp designs aren’t laid on by a machine—the passion found in each brush stroke comes from the steady hand of Fisk and few others.

Fisk’s curiosity into the world of pinstriping began at a young age. He consistently peeked inside a local sign-painting shop at a young age, and eventually, the shop offered him a job. It’s there where he learned how to handle a brush, mix colors, and dilute them properly.

Following his education, Lyle discovered pinstriping in a magazine and he knew he had found his calling. He’s spent the past few decades taking on pinstriping work and was one of the first artists to truly specialize in the art. In fact, Lyle’s services are in demand and he’s not too keen on retirement anytime soon.

“I get tired and frustrated, but I’m doing what I really like to do. Every day, I like getting a brush in my hand and trying to embellish something,” he said.

There may be many emulators, but Fisk is truly one of the patron saints of pinstriping.

Check Also

The McLaren F1 was almost all Formula 1 technology

It's hard to believe it's been a quarter of a century since the McLaren F1 took the world by storm. The now-legendary F1 has been heralded by car enthusiasts of multiple generations thanks to its world-record setting top-speed run and cutting-edge technology. Mind you, this car was built long before hybrids were a thing and compact disc sales were hot. What...

Goodwood Revival final day in photos; seeing is believing

The 2017 Goodwood Revival Meeting ended Sunday largely as it started: damp and dramatic. The weather may not have participated for the whole day, but the period racers from 1948 to 1966 did. Although there were several spins, loops, and wildly sliding cars, the event stayed mostly drama-free—unlike Friday's multimillion-dollar crash of a Ferrari 250...