Cadillac demonstrates its budding vehicle-to-infrastructure technology

Cadillac CTS V2I system

Cadillac CTS V2I system

A 2017 Cadillac CTS is already capable of “talking” with other CTS sedans—through the brand’s vehicle-to-vehicle technology (V2V)—but now the brand wants its cars to chat with surrounding infrastructure, too.

Cadillac demonstrated its first ever application of vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) technology, which allows cars to communicate with important objects and technology on the road. V2I technology opens a world of possibilities for cars and drivers, such as safety and environment-related alerts in various conditions.

In this application, a Cadilac CTS equipped with a V2I system successfully communicated with traffic signals located adjacent to the GM Warren Technical Center campus at the intersections of 12 Mile and 13 Mile roads. The signals sent information to the car using Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) .

Cadillac CTS with V2I technology

Cadillac CTS with V2I technology

Outside of tests, the data transmitted can help drivers avoid the potential of running a red light. By calculating the traffic signal’s operation and the CTS’ speed, it may also help drivers avoid a well-known decision process: slam on the brakes or speed through an intersection. With a simple alert, the car can inform a driver of a signal’s operation ahead.

Cadillac ensures the entire system is safe from intrusion and protects all driver information, too. Notably, the V2I system-equipped traffic signal may record that a vehicle ran a red light, but the system will not save or transmit information such as VIN or driver registration.

It’s the first time Cadillac has carried out such a test, but Audi beat General Motors’ luxury marque to the punch. Last year, Audi allowed media to test its first V2I system in Las Vegas. The system carried out communications with traffic lights throughout the city with ease. Audi’s system displays a handy timer to show when a signal will turn from red to green and senses when the driver is hurtling toward a protected left-hand turn.

Read also:
Lightning fast: Audi e-tron will charge quicker than a Tesla

As mentioned, the 2017 Cadillac CTS already houses V2V technology—the system allows the CTS to communicate with other V2V-equipped cars on the road. In turn, other vehicles may warn the CTS of various conditions from traffic to weather occurrences.

Of course, these are all small steps in a world in which the automobile is becoming more connected than ever. One day, we will certainly have “talking cars” in a non-literal sense of the phrase.

Check Also

American automakers lobbying for 91-octane gasoline as the new regular

Our gas is listed in a range of octane offerings, but American automakers are looking to simply that. By doing so, they say, they'll clean up the air, boost fuel economy, and save us money at the pump. According to a report in Automotive News, GM, Ford, and FCA are working with the U.S. Council for Automotive Research on a plan to change from three octane...

Conversation starter: V2X technology will let Toyota and Lexus cars "talk" in 2021

In 2021, the Toyota and Lexus vehicles will be able to "talk" to each other, to other cars, and to the infrastructure. The brands both plan for an aggressive rollout of vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications via Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) technology. Together V2I and V2V technology are known as V2X...