How to build an F1 car using only matchsticks

You might be good at clicking the bricks of a Lego kit into place. That’s child’s play, though, because you’re presented with clear instructions and the appropriate pieces required to accomplish your goal.

What if you were given a different building block of sorts and tasked with crafting something using just your imagination? Could you do it? The YouTube folks behind The Q certainly can, because they’ve shown us how to create a scaled-down F1 car…using only matchsticks.

And by only¬†we mean only, because there’s no glue involved here. The Formula One racing tinder box featured in this video is bonded by nothing more than bits of wood. The method to this madness lies with a basic grasp of engineering and some artistic vision.

The builder shows you how to make the wheels and then it’s a matter of assembling some basic cubes as building blocks. These cubes form most of the the structure of the car, and can be adapted to also create a rear spoiler and the side pontoons.

Once the body is formed and the rear wing is affixed, it’s time to add the four wheels. That’s when it all comes together. But it doesn’t last because it all comes apart just as quickly. A swipe of one more match brings this Formula One racer back to the ground as quickly as if it were powered by a Honda engine.

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