Aston Martin Valkyrie seats will be custom tailored for each buyer

Luxury and performance have long gone hand in hand with many automakers, but with today’s incredible technology, some companies are looking for ways to take things a step or two or ten further. Take this for example: Aston Martin plans to produce custom-tailored seats for each Valkyrie hypercar.

How will the British luxury/performance brand accomplish such a feat? Each customer will have a 3D body scan performed to ensure the seats match him/her perfectly. Every curve, line, and love handle will be accommodated by the tailored seats. Aston Martin Asia-Pacific president, Patrik Nilsson, mentioned the process during an interview with CNBC, but he did not offer up any additional details on the Red Bull Racing co-developed machine. We already know it will produce about 1,000 horsepower from a Cosworth-developed 6.5-liter V-12 engine and electric boost courtesy of Rimac. It’s also poised to weigh just 2,200 pounds.

Custom tailored seats may be expected with a rumored price tag of approximately $3.31 million. However, Aston Martin will only build a total of 175 Valkyrie hypercars, and 25 of them will be for track purposes only. That means 150 cars will be for sale to potential buyers.

Deep pockets are mandatory, but if the Ford GT selection process set any sort of standard, we bet potential Valkyrie buyers will face plenty of questions before they’re handed a key. And then they will have to submit themselves for a body scan.

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